Tell Bank of China: Save the Tapanuli Orangutan

Tapanuli Orangutan C Action Network

Join Ape Alliance on 21st March for an international day of action to save the Tapanuli

This is a call to any allies who can get to a branch of the Bank of China, anywhere in the world on 21st March.

You can find a list of branches below:
Europe
Asia-Pacific area
Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan
China

You can find the official protests going on and links to their Facebook events here
If there isn't a protest near you, start one!

Even without the resources to organise a large protest, if you (and a couple of friends) can take a photo outside a branch, holding a sign with #SaveTapanuliOrangutan and tagging @ApeAlliance on your social media, it would really help to increase the prominence of the effort.
You can add your plan for a protest to the Action Network map here

On the day there will hopefully be a temporary Facebook profile picture filter, which will obtain lots of media coverage. If you are organising a protest, send a press release to local media.

The Tapanuli orangutan population is already threatened by many outside forces, from habitat loss, to poaching, to climate change. This dam would be a final death knell. A few megawatts of electricity is not worth the existence of a 3.4 million-year-old orangutan species.

If you are not able to take part in one of the peaceful protests click here to sign a petition to call on the Bank of China to to stop financing Batang Toru dam.


Further information:
In 2017 scientists identified the Tapanuli orangutan as a distinct species, a sensational discovery which drew headlines around the world. These orangutans, found exclusively on the Indonesian island of Sumatra, are one of just eight species of great apes on the planet (including us). With only 800 left, they now face the immanent threat of extinction. A massive hydroelectric dam, financed by the Bank of China, would permanently fragment their habitat, and thus drastically reduce their genetic viability. We are calling on the Bank of China to immediately withdraw its funding for this dam and be a leader in green finance and biodiversity conservation.

The Tapanuli's discovery marks the first time since 1929 that a new member of the great ape family has been identified. It is one of only three species of orangutan on the planet.

Over the past decade, China has demonstrated that it has the potential to advance an agenda that both fosters economic growth and protects the environment. China has created national parks, promoted clean air initiatives, and invested in wind and solar. The government must show its commitment to sustainability and pull out its investments in the Batang Toru hydroelectric dam.

The need to transition away from fossil fuels is tremendous, but this transition must be done in ways that do not threaten one of humankind's closest living relatives with extinction. Indonesia, located on the rim of fire, has significant geothermal resources that could easily be expanded.

Join us on March 21 as we call on Bank of China to defund the dam and save the Tapanuli.

The Guardian recently published an article about the Tapanuli, and noted that "the dam will hit the highest density of Tapanuli orangutans left."

More info can be found in a new report, published by several NGOs who are at the frontlines of this campaign, and in articles in National Geographic and Mongabay.

The Tapanuli orangutan population is already threatened by many outside forces, from habitat loss, to poaching, to climate change. This dam would be a final death knell. A few megawatts of electricity is not worth the existence of a 3.4 million-year-old orangutan species.